Frank Glazier: 1934-1993

Frank Glazier was a legendary football coach from the Northeast. His no-nonsense style of coaching translated into a no-nonsense style of running football clinics. He demanded perfection from his speakers and attentiveness from his attendees. Frank was about football, through and through.

Frank was known as the guy who blew the whistle. When sessions started, Frank would blow his coaching whistle and demand coaches get into the rooms to hear the speakers.

Bob Wylie, Denver Broncos Offensive Line Coach, on Frank…

“I was one of the first coaches to work for Frank. He did his first clinic in his back yard in Long Branch, New Jersey. I believe it was 1976. I worked for him until he died. He always treated me real well and I owe him a lot. When I got into pro football 20 years ago, he would work me to death, three cities every week for a month!”


Bruce Cobleigh, Retired High School Coach, on Frank...

“Frank was the best football coach I ever knew. He was a great coaching mentor and friend, but he also did a lot to make us laugh. He was always thinking about football, which made him a bit absent-minded. No one understood this more than his wife Eleanor. At a clinic in Costa Mesa, she told me my job was to make sure he got to the airport and on to the plane after the clinic. I was to make sure he boarded the plane. Well, I did as instructed and watched him board his flight home. At about 10:00AM I got frantic call from Eleanor asking where Frank was, he never showed up at home. We eventually found him in Dallas. He walked off the plane to use the restroom and re-boarded the wrong flight. All with $55,000 cash in his pocket. Apparently he slept in the Dallas Airport all night.…typical Frank. Didn't faze him a bit, but drove Eleanor crazy!"


Chris Coughlin, current Glazier Clinics CEO, on Frank…

“I came to know Frank during the early 90s when I was an exhibitor for Rogers Athletics. There were always stories being told about Frank because he was so passionate about delivering great teaching to the coaches. I was exhibiting in Chicago one year and the coaches were buzzing with what had just happened in one of the sessions. Apparently one of the speakers was telling stories instead of starting his assigned topic. From the back of the room a booming voice said “YOU’RE ROBBING ‘EM!” Turns out, Frank stepped into the room and heard one of his speakers telling old coaching stories. “These coaches spent their hard earned money to learn how to be better football coaches and you’re telling stories!” He walked right up to the front, kicked the speaker out of the room and covered the rest of the topic himself. Apparently, Frank had warned this speaker previously and decided to take action. I have heard that this happened many times over the years. Frank was passionate about football and loved educating coaches. Whenever I go to clinics I still hear coaches exchanging Frank stories… twenty years later!"


Rich Erdelyi, Offensive Coordinator Carnegie Mellon University, on Frank...

“As far as football clinics were concerned, Frank Glazier was a visionary way ahead of his time. In the 1960s the only clinics around were the Kodak (now Nike) Coach of the Year Clinics. There would be one speaker every hour and they were usually head coaches of D1 schools who told stories and jokes. The only clinics where techniques and plays were taught were the individual college spring clinics. Frank realized it was the coordinators and position coaches who did the coaching. These are the people he hired. He gave the speakers at least three hours to give specific talks. Glazier Clinics still operate under this model today! He wanted X’s and O’s and demonstrations of techniques. He was not a fan of films. I don’t think he would have liked the PowerPoints of today. He expected you to be organized and stick to the topic! I was there when he fired a prominent coach on stage for not keeping to his subject matter! Frank ran his clinics like a football practice. The whistle, getting coaches back in the rooms, always on time...that was Frank's idea of a successful clinic. And Frank was generous to a fault. He wanted to give people their money’s worth and he did. He gave a young coach from a D3 school a break many years ago and I’m still trying to repay his help and kindness. He was truly one of a kind."

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